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Eochaidh Mugmedón, King of Connacht

Eochaidh Mugmedón, King of Connacht[1]

Male Abt 287 - Abt 365  (~ 78 years)

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  • Name Eochaidh Mugmedón   [1
    Suffix King of Connacht 
    Born Abt 287 
    Gender Male 
    Died Abt 365  Tara/Teamhair, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • «b»http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cssbct/cgi-bin/gedlkup.php/n=royal?royal08085«/b»

      «b»http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps10/ps10_313.htm«/b»

      Earned his nickname "Slaves Lords" by slave raids on Roman Britain, in one of which he carried off and married a princess of the Ancient Britons called Carina, by whom he had a son.

      By his wife, Carthann, daughter of a British king, Eochaid had the son Niall. By another wife, Mong Fionn, daughter of the King of Munster, Eochaid had four sons, Brian, Fiachar, Ailill, and Fergus. Mong Fionn was a bitter, jealous and ambitious woman, who set her heart upon having her son, Brian, succeed his father as Ard Righ. As Niall was his father's favourite, Mong Fionn did not rest until she had outcast him and his mother, Carthann, and made Carthann her menial, carrying water to the court. The child was rescued by a great poet of that time, Torna, who reared and educated him. When he had reached budding manhood, Torna brought him back to court to take his rightful place - much to his father's joy. Then Niall, showing strength of character, even in his early youth, took his mother from her menial task, and restored her to her place.

      Ancestors of Eochaid are based on myth and legend as recorded by 'The Annals of the Four Masters', which was compiled at least 600 years after the
      facts.


      was the 124th Monarch; and in the 8th year of his reign died a natural death at Tara, A.D. 365; leaving issue four sons, viz., by his first wife Mong Fionn:\emdash I. Brian; II. Fiachra; III. Olioll; IV. Fergus. And, by his second wife, Carthan Cais Dubh (or Cariona), daughter of the Celtic King of Britain,\emdash V. Niall Mór, commonly called "Niall of the Nine Hostages." Mong Fionn was dau. of Fiodhach, and sister of Crimthann, King of Munster, of the Heberian Sept, and successor of Eochaidh in the Monarchy. This Crimthann was poisoned by his sister Mong Fionn, in opes that Brian, her oldest son by Eochaidh, would succeed in the Monarchy. To avoid suspicion she herself drank of the same poisoned cup which she presented to her brother; but, notwithstanding that she lost her life by so doing, yet her expectations were not realised, for the said Brian and her other three sons by the said Eochaidh werew laid aside (whether out of horror of the mother's inhumanity in poisoning her brother, or otherwise, is not known), and teh youngest son of Eochaidh, by Carthan Cais Dubh, was preferred to the Monarchy. I. Brian, from him were descended the Kings, nobility and gentry of Conacht\emdash Tirloch Mór O'Connor, the 121st, and Roderic O'Connor, the 183rd Monarch of Ireland. II. Fiachra's descendants gave their name to Tir-Fiachra ("Tireragh"), co. Sligo, and possessed also parts of co. Mayo. III. Olioll's descendants settled in Sligo\emdash in tir Oliolla (or Tirerill). This Fiachra had five sons:\emdash 1. Earc Cuilbhuide; 2. Breasal; 3. Conaire; 4. Feredach (or Dathi); and 5. Amhalgaidh.


      Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.


      «b»http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O%27Boyle_Donegal«/b»

      «u»Eochaid Mugmedon <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eochaid_Mugmedon>«/u» (Eochaidh XII) King 358-366


      «b»http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eochaid_Mugmedon

      Eochaid Mugmedón«/b» ("slave-lord", pron. /' 'm according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, was a «u»High King of Ireland «/u» of the 4th century, best known as the father of «u»Niall of the Nine Hostages «/u» and ancestor of the «u»Uí Néill «/u» and «u»Connachta «/u» dynasties. He is not mentioned in the list of kings of «u»Tara «/u» in the «u»«i»Baile Chuind «/u»«/i» (The Ecstasy of Conn, but is included in the synthetic lists of High Kings in the «u»«i»Lebor Gabála Érenn «/u»«/i», the «u»Irish annals «/u», «u»Geoffrey Keating «/u»'s history, and the «i»Laud Synchronisms«/i».
      According to the «u»«i»Lebor Gabála Érenn «/i»[1]«/u» and its derivative works, Eochaid was the son of the former High King «u»Muiredach Tírech «/u», a descendant of «u»Conn Cétchathach «/u». Muiredach was overthrown and killed by «u»Cáelbad «/u» son of Cronn Bradruí, an Ulster king, but Cálbad only ruled one year before Eochaid killed him and took the throne. The «i»Lebor Gabála«/i» says he extracted the «i»bórama«/i» or cow-tribute from «u»Leinster «/u» without a battle. However, Keating records that he was defeated in the Battle of Cruachan Claonta by the Leinster king «u»Énnae Cennsalach «/u».«u»[2]«/u»
      According to the saga "The Adventures of the Sons of Eochaid Mugmedon",«u»[3]«/u» he is said to have had two wives: «u»Mongfind «/u», daughter of Fidach, who bore him four sons, «u»Brion «/u», «u»Ailill «/u», «u»Fiachrae «/u» and Fergus; and «u»Cairenn Chasdub «/u», daughter of Sachell Balb, king of the «u»Saxons «/u», who bore him his most famous son, Niall. Mongfind is said to have hated Cairenn, and forced her to expose her child, but the baby was rescued and raised by a poet called «u»Torna «/u». When Niall grew up he returned to Tara and rescued his mother from the servitude Mongfind had placed her under. Mongfind appears to have originally been a supernatural personage: the saga "The Death of Crimthann mac Fidaig" says the festival of «u»Samhain «/u» was commonly called the "Festival of Mongfind", and prayers were offered to her on Samhain eve.«u»[4]«/u» Although it is probably anachronistic for Eochaid to have had a Saxon wife, T. F. O'Rahilly argues that the name «i»Cairenn«/i» is derived from the Latin name «u»Carina «/u», and that it is plausible that she might have been a Romano-Briton.«u»[5]«/u» Indeed, Keating describes her not as a Saxon but as the "daughter of the king of Britain".«u»[6]«/u»
      After ruling for seven or eight years, Eochaid died of an illness at Tara, and was succeeded by Mongfind's brother «u»Crimthann mac Fidaig «/u», king of «u»Munster «/u». Keating dates his reign to 344-351, the «u»«i»Annals of the Four Masters «/u»«/i» to 357-365.«u»[7]«/u» Daniel P. McCarthy, based on the Irish annals, dates his death to 362.«u»[8]«/u»

      «b»References
      «u»1. ^«/u»«/b» R. A. Stewart MacAlister (ed. & trans.), «u»«i»Lebor Gabála Érenn <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebor_Gab%C3%A1la_%C3%89renn>«/u»«/i» Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 345-347
      «u»«b»2. ^«/u»«/b» «u»Geoffrey Keating <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_Keating>«/u», «i»Foras Feasa ar Éirinn«/i» «u»1.47 <http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100054/text057.html>«/u»
      «u»«b»3. ^«/u»«/b» Tom Peete Cross & Clark Harris Slover (eds.), «u»"The Adventures of the Sons of Eochaid Mugmedon" <http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/eochaid.html>«/u», «i»Ancient Irish Tales, 1936, pp. 508-513«/i»
      «u»«b»4, ^«/u»«/b» «u»"The Death of Crimthann son of Fidach" <http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/crimthann.html>«/u» (translator unknown)
      «u»«b»5. ^«/u»«/b» «u»T. F. O'Rahilly <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._F._O%27Rahilly>«/u», «i»Early Irish History and Mythology«/i», 1946, Chapter 12
      «u»«b»6. ^«/u»«/b» Geoffrey Keating, «i»Foras Feasa ar Éirinn«/i» «u»1.48 <http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100054/text058.html>«/u»
      «u»«b»7. ^«/u»«/b» «u»«i»Annals of the Four Masters <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annals_of_the_Four_Masters>«/u»«/i» «u»M357 <http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100005A/text030.html>«/u»-«u»365 <http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100005A/text031.html>«/u»
      «u»«b»8. ^«/u»«/b» Daniel P. McCarthy, «i»The Chronology of the Irish Annals«/i»
      Retrieved from "«u»<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eochaid_Mugmedon>«/u»"
    Person ID I4973  Glenn Cook Family
    Last Modified 19 Jun 2013 

    Father Muireadach (Muredach) Tireach, King of Connaught,   b. 261,   d. Abt 356  (Age 95 years) 
    Mother Muirion, Princess of Ulster,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F551616666  Group Sheet

    Family 1 Mong Fionn,   d. 378, Inish Donglais, County Mayo, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Brion, King of Connacht,   b. Dalriada, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 453
     2. Fiachra,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Ailill mac Echach Mugmedóin,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 19 Jun 2013 
    Family ID F551616668  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Cairenn,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Niall of the Nine Hostages Noígillach, King of Ireland and Tara,   d. 453
    Last Modified 19 Jun 2013 
    Family ID F551617625  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    Connachta Family Tree
    Connachta Family Tree

  • Sources 
    1. [S36] Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Brian Tompsett, Dept of Computer Science, University of Hull, England(B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk), (This work is Copyright b 1994-2002 Brian C Tompsett).